Vol.2, No.3

5 tips for high school offensive guards

five rules for high school offensive guards to live by

An offensive guard walks off the field
Photo Credit: Suzanne Tucker
High school offensive guards do not receive much of the glory of playing the game. But they receive much of the responsibility of making the offense work. The job they do in the trenches is key to the effectiveness of the entire offensive squad.

In order to be successful the high scholl offensive guard must adhere to at least five rules.

Rule number one is to win every match-up with a defensive opponent opposite you. Win them all. At least win them all in your mind and you are halfway there. It is a game of self discipline. If you think you can, if you know you can win you will most of the time.

Rule number two is to know your assignment. Know exactly what is expected of you on every play. If one person breaks down the whole machine is off-kilter. Some coaching departments grade or score their offensive pHigh school offensive guards do not receive much of the glory of playing the game. But they receive much of the responsibility of making the offense work. The job they do in the trenches is key to the effectiveness of the entire offensive squad.

In order to be successful the high school offensive guard must adhere to at least five rules.

Rule number one is to win every match-up with a defensive opponent opposite you. Win them all. At least win them all in your mind and you are halfway there. It is a game of self discipline. If you think you can, if you know you can win you will most of the time.

Rule number two is to know your assignment. Know exactly what is expected of you on every play. If one person breaks down the whole machine is off-kilter. Some coaching departments grade or score their offensive players for effectiveness on each play. This is a good tool. It will tell you how well you are understanding your job.

Rule number three is to pass block so effectively the defensive player over you will not get one sack during the entire game. There is some fancy footwork and some mental adjustments you can make to improve your chances of defeating the defense. An offensive guard must quickly change his way of thinking from a blocking scheme to one of pass protection in the blink of an eye. A good offensive guard has no trouble during this transition in thinking.

Rule number four is to stay with your block. Once you execute a block stay with it until the referee blows his whistle. The play is not over until then. Many touchdowns or big plays have been made because the offensive guard has stayed on his opponent opening up a run to daylight.

Rule number five is to use your head. If your opponent is just plain physically stronger or bigger than you are use finesse. Or on the other hand if he is smaller and speedier you must make adjustments to his play. Also know what the play count is. You do not want to cost your team yardage because you forgot what count the ball will be snapped on. It's the simple things sometimes that separate the good from the great.

Some of the greatest offensive guards in history have not been the strongest, or the biggest. They have been the intelligent ones. They have been the guards who can adapt throughout the game.

Jerry Kramer was one of the best ever. A new guard would do well to read anything any story or book about him. Gene Upshaw comes to mind also.

When is high school use the correct protective gear, follow the rules, and listen to your coach. Study your playbook over and over again. Work on your techniques however subtle. If you ca not over power an opponent use your brains on him. Remember if you are a pulling guard to use the best technique you can to fool the defense. If you are blocking on a power play then drive hard and stay low. It's usually the one who hits hardest and who hits first that wins the battle.

layers for effectiveness on each play. This is a good tool. It will tell you how well you are understanding your job.

Rule number three is to pass block so effectively the defensive player over you will not get one sack during the entire game. There is some fancy footwork and some mental adjustments you can make to improve your chances of defeating the defense. An offensive guard must quickly change his way of thinking from a blocking scheme to one of pass protection in the blink of an eye. A good offensive guard has no trouble during this transition in thinking.

Rule number four is to stay with your block. Once you execute a block stay with it until the referee blows his whistle. The play is not over until then. Many touchdowns or big plays have been made because the offensive guard has stayed on his opponenent opening up a run to daylight.

Rule number five is to use your head. If your opponent is just plain physically stronger or bigger than you are use finesesse. Or on the other hand if he is smaller and speedier you must make adjustments to his play. Also know what the play count is. You do not want to cost your team yardage because you forgot what count the ball will be snapped on. It's the simple things sometimes that separate the good from the great.

Some of the greatest offensive guards in history have not been the strongest, or the biggest. They have been the intelligent ones. They have been the guards who can adapt throughout the game.

Jerry Kramer was one of the best ever. A new guard would do well to read anything any story or book about him. Gene Upshaw comes to mind also.

When is high school use the correct protective gear, follow the rules, and listen to your coach. Study your playbook over and over again. Work on your techniques however subtle. If you ca not over power an opponenet use your brains on him. Remember if you are a pulling guard to use the best technique you can to fool the defense. If you are blocking on a power play then drive hard and stay low. It's usually the one who hits hardest and who hits first that wins the battle.